Encyclopedia: Zhang Gong

Zhang Gong; Chang Kung; 張恭

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Zhang Gong 張恭

Lived: AD ?–c.230

Biographies:
None Available

Served: Wei

Refused to work with tribes despite his son being held hostage.

Officer Details

Wade-Giles: Chang Kung
Simplified Chinese: 张恭
Pronunciation: Zhang1 Gong1
Cantonese (Yale): Jeung Gung
Cantonese (Jyutpin): Zoeng Gung
Min-Nan: Thio Bun

Birthplace: Dunhuang

Rank and Titles

Officer of Merit; Chief Clerk; Wu and Ji Colonel; Marquis; Bearer of the Mace (posthumous)

Family and Relationships

Zhang Jiu (Son); Zhang Hua (Cousin)

Biography

Historic (Confirmed)

Zhang Gong held office in the prefecture of Dunhuang as Officer of Merit. After the death of the Administrator of Dunhuang, Ma Ai, Zhang Gong was elected by the people to be Chief Clerk. He sent his son, Zhang Jiu, to urge the court to swiftly appoint a new prefect.

At the time, Zhang Jin and Huang Hua led a mixed group of Chinese and barbarians in rebellion. They took Zhang Gong’s son hostage and blackmailed Zhang Gong. Zhang Jiu secretly sent a letter to Zhang Gong urging him to resist instead of give in to the rebels’ demands. In response, Zhang Gong sent troops to keep Huang Hua in check. He also sent a smaller force of cavalry to intercept and welcome the newly appointed prefect, Yin Feng. The Wei general Su Ze then lead a force to attack Zhang Jin at Zhangye. Huang Hua feared that he would be flanked by Zhang Gong and did not move to support his rebel ally. As a result, Zhang Jin was defeated and executed. Huang Hua surrendered. Zhang Gong was promoted for his valiant service. He remained in service until his death in AD 230.

Source: A Biographical Dictionary of the Later-Han to Three Kingdoms by Dr. Rafe de Crespigny, Chronicle of the Three Kingdoms by Achilles Fang

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May 13, 2014