Encyclopedia: Wei Ji

Wei Ji (Boru); Wei Chi (Po-ju); 衛覬 (伯儒)

You are here: [ Home –> Three Kingdoms History –> Encyclopedia –> Wei Ji ]

Welcome to the Romance of the Three Kingdoms Encyclopedia
You are viewing the profile of Wei Ji (衛覬), styled Boru (伯儒), born in Hedong. “A scholarly man. Advised settling the likes of Han Sui, against excess, proposed legal reforms.” Wei Ji was affiliated with and the Wei Kingdom. Return to the Three Kingdoms Encyclopedia to learn more or explore our Encyclopedia Directory to browse by kingdom or category.

Top?

Wei Ji (Boru) 衛覬 (伯儒)

Lived: Unknown

Biographies:
None Available

Served: Wei

A scholarly man. Advised settling the likes of Han Sui, against excess, proposed legal reforms.

Officer Details

Wade-Giles: Wei Chi (Po-ju)
Simplified Chinese: 卫觊 (伯儒)
Pronunciation: Wei4 Ji4 (Bo2ru2)

Birthplace: Hedong

Rank and Titles

Magistrate in Youfufeng; Secretariat; Imperial Clerk (AD 199); Returned to Secretariat; Palace Attendant (AD 215); Returned to Secretariat; Enfeoffed (under Cao Pi); Further Promoted and Enfeoffed (under Cao Rui)

Family and Relationships

Wei Guan (Son); Wei Heng (Grandson)

Literary Appearances

Sanguozhi: Wei 1, Wei 11, Wei 20, Wei 21

Jin Shu: 30

Zizhi tongjian: 63, 66, 71, 73

Biography

Historic (Confirmed)

A precocious child, Wei Ji became known early for his scholarly ability. Expert on angient script, on the exotic “Bird Seal” script, the official li shu “Clerical Style” and the informal cao shu “Grass Style,” Wei Ji probably compiled a first draft of the historical discussion Siti shushi “Aspects of the Four Styles of Calligraphy,” which was completed by his grandson Wei Heng. (1)

(1) Excerpt from Rafe de Crespigny, HdO: A Biographical Dictionary of the Later Han and Three Kingdoms Periods.

When Cao Cao launched his campaign against Yuan Shao in AD 199 he was concerned with Liu Biao in Jing. Wei Ji was appointed Imperial Clerk and dispatched on embassy to Liu Zhang. Liu Zhang had an old quarrel with Liu Biao and Wei Ji was to gain his support in causing trouble for Liu Biao so as to keep him occupied while Cao Cao campaigned. Wei Ji was unable to continue beyond Chang’an as the road was blocked.

As order was restored from the previous civil war refugees sought to return from Jing province, where they had previously fled, back into the Chang’an region. To support them Wei Ji proposed to Xun Yu that a previous salt monopoly be restored, and the proceeds used to support the refugees. Xun Yu put the proposal to Cao Cao, who approved.

In AD 211 Zhong Yao proposed and advance toward Chang’an in hopes of eventually securing the Hanzhong region. At Cao Cao’s request, Xun Yu consulted Wei Ji, who proposed that the regional lords could be bought with rank and reward. Cao Cao used Zhong Yao’s proposal, but when all was settled and he calculated the cost, he regretted not having followed Wei Ji’s advice.

Wei Ji became Palace Attendant in AD 211. When Cao Pi succeeded Cao Cao, Wei Ji served in the Han puppet court, and played a large role in the edicts behind Emperor Xian’s submission to Wei. He was further promoted and enfeoffed by Cao Rui, and he continued to serve in the Wei courts, opposing extravagance and proposing legal reform. (2)

(2) Biography sources: Rafe de Crespigny, HdO: A Biographical Dictionary of the Later Han and Three Kingdoms Periods; Sanguozhi: Wei 20.

Kongming’s
Archives

Sections

Novel and History

Officers and Kingdoms

Literature and Language

Universal

May 13, 2014